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December 22, 2011 / Wythe

Hypercamouflage: paraphrasing Cyclonopedia

In hypercamouflage, the soldier becomes the same as the civilian and thus evades detection by the enemy.  The enemy is forced to fight urbanized war (strategy—which troops brought to which front), as opposed to merely urban warfare (tactics—orders to troops at the front), or white war.  This is the same in the animal kingdom, where the ant-spider morphologically becomes the ant in order that the ants must attack one another to have any chance of ferreting out (the mixed metaphor is intentional here) the monster within the colony.

Thus hypercamouflage causes the equilibrium of the border to implode:  What was excluded (cannibalism) is invited, in order to stem the danger from the now-inside outsider.  The insider-outsider is The Thing of science fiction; the ant-spider becomes not only an ant (a mole, a spy, a discoverable quantum), but every ant; the jihadi who uses hypercamouflage becomes not one, but every civilian…  To defeat hypercamouflage, the entire territory of the city must be controlled by fire, and the controllers (the Westerners; Delta Force; the ants, e.g.) must become feyadeen, whom we now call jihadis—must become The Thing, the monster.

As soon as signs are worn by distinct sides of the conflict, borders (which are permeable) return.  War becomes warfare (tactics).  As long as the signs are 100% civilian, war (strategy) hunts down warmachines (living tactics, soldiers, artillery, munitions depots, spies).  The fog of war itself, especially when one side of the conflict has gone into hypercamouflage, defeats all warmachines, on every side.  Thus the jihadi’s instinct is suicidal even if he is never a suicide bomber:  He is inviting total fire to level (smooth out) the city.  He is inviting the desert.  This is not the black war of secret operations, but the white war of the glaring sand (or snow—The Thing is found in Antarctica).

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